WVS Hicks Students Train on the Mission Rabies Veterinary Truck

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WVS Hicks Students Train on the Mission Rabies Veterinary Truck

Fri 13th Jul 2018

The Mission Rabies truck has been based in India for the last four years and continues to provide a lifeline for the animals and communities in even the most remote regions. This 6-wheel drive mobile veterinary clinic has been utilised by the team at the WVS Hicks ITC to provide local vets with hands-on training out in the field! Here’s an update on what’s been happening in the past six months…

Spending most of its time in the state of Goa, the truck has been visited by participants on the Hicks surgical training courses, helping our teams conduct their mass animal birth control and rabies vaccination programmes in partnership with our sister charity Mission Rabies and with assistance from the Government of Goa. 

Students spend a couple of days of each course out with the truck, operating on animals in the community and learning the essential skills needed for treatments in challenging environments. The truck allows our veterinary teams to not only reach isolated communities but also perform surgeries out in the field, with all the specialist equipment of a full veterinary clinic. By training local Indian vets, we are ensuring these new vets have the skills needed to improve the animal welfare situation across their native country! 

In total, the truck has helped train 57 Indian students and 17 international veterinary students since the beginning of 2018 and an incredible 1,318 dogs and 90 cats have been sterilised in the mobile unit in these six months alone!!

The truck is also utilised for specialist veterinary courses, of which courses on anaesthesia, ultrasound and animal behaviour have recently been run, allowing the next generation of veterinary professionals to gain more knowledge on all aspects of small animal veterinary care using high standards of equipment and learning from experts in the veterinary world!

The team see a variety of cases when they’re out with the truck, from dogs with plastic bottles stuck on their heads or jaw, to transmissible venereal tumours (a form of cancer) and everything in between. Aside from emergency cases, owners can bring their pets to the truck to take advantage of the free sterilisation service and excellent facilities. 

The truck is spending July in Nagpur for surgical training courses in animal birth control but will be moving to Pune City in Maharashtra, the state neighbouring Goa, before finally heading back to Goa in time for World Rabies Day on the 28th September.